Monday, January 11, 2010

Alcoholism & Abuse

Oftentimes, people who abuse alcohol do not know or will not admit that they have a problem with alcohol. But the effects of alcohol can obviously be devastating to a person’s health and the health and well being of their families and others.

According to the National Institute of Aging, there are two types of drinking patterns: heavy, binge drinking and long-term drinking that takes place over the course of several years.

Sometimes people turn to alcohol when major life changes happen, such as the loss of a job or loved one. Other times, alcoholism may begin slowly through social situations and build over time.

In many cases, drinking may seem like relief from problems or stressful situations. But, after continued use, drinking can often lead to problems.

It’s important to realize that not everyone who drinks regularly has a drinking problem and not all problem drinkers drink every day.

These are some of the signs to watch for if you think a loved one has a drinking problem:

•A person drinks to calm his or her nerves, forget their worries or reduce depression;
•A person gulps or guzzles drinks;
•A person frequently has more than one drink per day;
•A person lies about drinking or tries to hide his or her drinking;
•A person hurts people while drinking;
•A person continues to need more and more drinking to get high;
•A person feels irritable and resentful when not drinking; and
•A person has medical, social or financial worries caused by drinking, to name a few.

To get help for alcoholism, an alcoholic needs support from family and friends. To help someone get help for alcoholism, talk to a doctor. He or she can provide guidance and advice for treatment options.

Since 1972, the renowned Clearbrook Treatment Centers have been providing effective treatment programs for adults and adolescents who suffer from alcoholism and/or chemical dependency. Clearbrook’s rehabilitation program is based upon the belief that alcoholism and chemical dependency is a primary disease and that the suffering addict and his or her family members deserve immediate help.

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