Tuesday, February 9, 2010

Prevent Relapse

The Cycle of Quitting, Withdrawal, Craving And Relapse

When the addict initially tries to quit, cells in the brain that have become used to large amounts of these metabolites are now forced to deal with much decreased amounts. Even as the withdrawal symptoms subside, the brain “demands” that the addict give it more of the drug. This is called drug craving.

Craving is an extremely powerful urge and can cause a person to create all kinds of “reasons” they should begin using drugs again. He is now trapped in an endless cycle of trying to quit, craving, relapse and fear of withdrawal.

Eventually, the brain cells will again become used to having lowered drug metabolites. But, because deposits of drug metabolites release back into the bloodstream from fatty tissues for years, craving and relapse remain a cause for concern.

Left unhandled, the presence of metabolites even in microscopic amounts cause the brain to react as if the addict had again actually taken the drug and can set up craving and relapse even after years of sobriety.

Handling the Drug Metabolites
Clearbrook utilizes a combination of exercise, induced sweating in a sauna, and nutritional supplements to eliminate the traces of drugs, or metabolites, stored in the fatty tissue.

No drugs of any kind are used at Cleabrook, such as “addiction substitute drugs” like methadone.
The results of this phase of the program are:

•Reduction or elimination of drug and alcohol cravings.
•Reduction or elimination of many symptoms associated with drug addiction and alcoholism. These can include depression, irritability, and fatigue.
•Ability to think more clearly.
•Improved memory and attention span.
•Increased energy.
•Increased sense of well being.
•Enthusiasm toward Life.

Handling the “Biochemical Personality”

After successfully eliminating drug traces from the body, we move through a series of specialized study courses that complement and expand on each other to help the addict recognize the old addiction life-style and thought processes.

These unique cognitive and objective therapies are followed by life skills training, delivered in easily understood phases designed to complement and expand on each other.

The drug rehabilitation program is complete when the former addict recognizes and accepts responsibility for old habit patterns and “reasons why”. The person’s relationships with and understanding of himself, his family, friends and environment are fully examined and rehabilitated.

On the person’s own self-determinism, and with no physical or mental “hooks” into past cravings and behavior, he or she is no longer an addict and has regained his or her own true nature.

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